Active Travel

Whether you are back in the office or doing the school run, there are lots of ways you can make your commute an active, healthy and enjoyable one!

Active travel means making your journeys physically active, by means such as cycling, walking, or scooting. They are often short journeys such as a trip the supermarket or into town, or your daily commute to work or school. You can incorporate active travel into longer journeys too, by parking further away or taking part of the journey by train or bus.

Benefits of Active Travel

  • Improve air quality and reduces pollution / noise
  • Reduce congestion, in built up cities and towns it can be quicker to use active modes of transport than to travel by car
  • Incorporates physical activity into your daily routine – reduces the need to find extra time in the day to be active. Physical activity is good for our physical and mental health.
  • More cost effective (for the individual and the economy) – less money spent on fuel and public transport
  • Resolves parking issues at workplaces and outside schools
  • Fewer cars mean the roads are safer
  • Improves mood and concentration – improving productivity at work or school
  • COVID-19 – safer mode of travel and reduces chance of virus transmission

Active Travel to School

Active Travel means happier, healthier children, helping them to achieve their recommend activity levels every day.

It's been proven that children who do some form of exercise, especially a walk before school, do better in class because they arrive refreshed, fit and ready to learn.

During morning peak traffic times, one in five cars on the road are taking children school, contributing to congestion, air pollution and carbon emissions.

The school run alone is responsible for generating two million tonnes of CO2 per year. Imagine what we could achieve if we began converting some of these rides to strides?

Top Tips for Walking to School / Work

  • Plan your route – it might be a different journey to the one you would do in the car. Pick quieter roads or footpaths, it will be safer and the air your breather will be healthier.
  • Predict how long it will take you to walk to make sure you have enough time in the mornings.
  • Wear the right shoes and socks. Bring your work or school shoes in a bag and change footwear when you arrive at your destination.
  • If you normally take a briefcase to work, it may be comfier to use a rucksack for walks that are longer in duration.
  • Be prepared for bad weather (coat, umbrella, change of clothes/footwear).
  • Use your active commute as an opportunity to teach your children about road safety.

Top Tips for Cycling to Work / School

  • Begin with a frequency and distance that is achievable. Perhaps get a lift to work and try riding home to begin with.
  • Use a route planner to help ensure you are riding on roads suitable for your ability.
  • Do a practice cycle at the weekend. Learn the route so you know how much time you will need to get to work or school on time.
  • Learn how to change your tyre and perform basic bike maintenance checks. You don't want a mechanical failure to make you late.
  • Pack your bag the night before. Remember a change of clothes or footwear if you are wearing activewear for your commute.
  • Give yourself time to shower and change when you get to work if you need to.
  • Safety first – always remember a helmet, lights, and reflective clothing.

Useful Links

You're performing the exercises linked from our website at your own risk

Whilst every effort has been made to verify the information on the Active Together and associated pages, LRS is not responsible for the accuracy or content of external websites. Whilst taking part in physical activity, participants should ensure they take part at a level which is appropriate to them and their health and are responsible for ensuring they check the credentials and health and safety requirements for each activity. It is recommended that participants follow the Chief Medical Officers Guidelines for physical activity. Participants will choose to utilise these links and take part in activities at their own risk.

If you're unsure about your ability, it might be wise to start gradually and build up. Please feel free to refer to the UK Chief Medical Officer's Physical Activity Guidelines when determining the level of activity appropriate to you.

Make sure you warm up and cool down to prevent injury, and make sure you keep hydrated.

Stop the exercises immediately if you feel faint or unwell, and if you still feel dizzy or unwell have a rest. Next time try something less strenuous, building up your activity gradually.

Finally, please continue to follow the government's guidance on how to prevent the spread of Coronavirus.